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The Lions Club of

Berowra

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About Us

The Lions Club of Berowra - What We Do

Meetings:

We have our Dinner Meetings on the third Thursday of the month at various venues in the District and these are mainly social and informative nights. Club business is avoided at these meetings unless circumstances dictate otherwise. All formal business of the Club is managed at the Board Meeting on the first Thursday of the month. All members are welcome to attend the Board Meeting but only the elected officers are required to attend.

Activities:

The Op Shop in the Berowra Marketplace Shopping Centre, below IGA, is proving to be a great money-spinner and we are looking for areas/causes in the community where we can share the profits of the shop. The shop is open from Monday to Saturday from 10.00 am to 1.00 pm and we are very lucky to have enough helpers to be able to open on week-days, leaving those of us with other commitments during the week to help with a roster on Saturday mornings. Current membership levels mean that we each work one Saturday every six weeks or so.

The Op Shop is also an official Mobile Muster collection point. We collect old and unused unused mobile phones, batteries and accessories and send them away for recycling.

Our other major commitment is the Old District Hall on the corner of Berowra Waters Road and Crowley Road. Berowra Lions manages and maintains this hall on behalf of Hornsby Shire Council and profits from the hall are used for maintenance or repairs to the hall and any surplus funds can be used in the community. Council does not take any money from this hall, all money stays in the community. Bookings for the hall are managed on our behalf by the staff at The Professionals Real Estate and the Club's Hall Director oversees the collection of the money, supervision of the cleaning and minor maintenance.

We hold a BBQ/Sausage Sizzle every 2 months for a variety of causes such as SIDS/KIDS, Diabetes Australia, Asthma Foundation, Lions Cord Blood Foundation, etc. Hours of operation are 9.30 am to 1.30 pm (approx) and this activity also gives us a great opportunity to promote Lions at work in the community.

Lions Christmas Cakes are being organized again this year. We will be selling these through the Op shop and The Bush Telegraph office.

Occasionally we are called upon to assist with activities such selling buttons, etc for other charities (e.g. Daffodil Day, etc), helping with collections (e.g. Red Shield Appeal, Vinnies Food Drive, etc) or any other cause needing a helping hand.

As our membership grows, we will be looking at new projects that will be of benefit to the community without over-extending our membership or resources. We welcome input form all members with ideas for projects or causes to support.

Social:

We are looking at re-introducing some social activities such a dinner parties, theatre groups, social sports, etc. Nothing is organized at the moment but as our membership grows we will be seeking suggestions and initiating some outings.

Lions International

Founded: 1917
Motto: "We Serve"
Members: 1.35 million
Clubs: 45,000 clubs in more than 200 countries and geographic areas

Mission:

To create and foster a spirit of understanding among all people for humanitarian needs by providing voluntary service through community involvement and international cooperation.

PURPOSES

  • To Create and foster a spirit of understanding among the peoples of the world.
  • To Promote the principles of good government and good citizenship.
  • To Fund and otherwise serve the civic, cultural, social and moral welfare of the community.
  • To Assist financially, culturally, socially, and morally the disabled, disadvantaged and infirm of the community both directly and also indirectly.
  • To Unite the clubs in the bonds of friendship, good fellowship and mutual understanding.
  • To Provide a forum for the open discussion of all matters of public interest; provided, however, that partisan politics and sectarian religion shall not be debated by club members.
  • To Encourage service-minded people to serve their community without personal financial reward, and to encourage efficiency and promote high ethical standards in commerce, industry, professions, public works and private endeavours

CODE of ETHICS

  • To Show my faith in the worthiness of my vocation by industrious application to the end that I may merit a reputation for quality of service.
  • To Seek success and to demand all fair remuneration or profit as my just due, but to accept no profit or success at the price of my own self-respect lost because of unfair advantage taken or because of questionable acts on my part.
  • To Remember that in building up my business it is not necessary to tear down another's; to be loyal to my clients or customers and true to myself.
  • Whenever a doubt arises as to the right or ethics of my position or action towards others, to resolve such doubt against myself.
  • To Hold friendship as an end and not a means. To hold that true friendship exists not on account of the service performed by one to another, but that true friendship demands nothing but accepts service in the spirit in which it is given.
  • Always to bear in mind my obligations as a citizen to my nation, my state and my community, and to give to them my unswerving loyalty in word, act and deed. To give them freely of my time, labour and means.
  • To Aid others by giving my sympathy to those in distress, my aid to the weak, and my substance to the needy.
  • To be Careful with my criticism and liberal with my praise; to build up and not destroy.

A Brief History of Lions International

The International Association of Lions Clubs began as the dream of Chicago businessman Melvin Jones. He believed that local business clubs should expand their horizons from purely professional concerns to the betterment of their communities and the world at large.

Jones' group, the Business Circle of Chicago, agreed. After contacting similar groups around the United States, an organizational meeting was held on June 7, 1917 in Chicago, Illinois, USA. The new group took the name of one of the invited groups, the "Association of Lions Clubs," and a national convention was held in Dallas, Texas, USA in October of that year. A constitution, by-laws, objects and code of ethics were approved.

Among the objects adopted in those early years was one that read, "No club shall hold out the financial betterment of its members as its object." This call for unselfish service to others remains one of the association’s main tenets. Just three years after its formation, the association became international when the first club in Canada was established in 1920. Major international expansion continued as clubs were established, particularly throughout Europe, Asia and Africa during the 1950s and ’60s.

In 1925, Helen Keller addressed the Lions international convention in Cedar Point, Ohio, USA. She challenged Lions to become "knights of the blind in the crusade against darkness." From this time, Lions clubs have been actively involved in service to the blind and visually impaired.

Broadening its international role, Lions Clubs International helped the United Nations form the Non-Governmental Organizations sections in 1945 and continues to hold consultative status with the U.N.

In 1990, Lions launched its most aggressive sight preservation effort, SightFirst. The US$143.5 million program strives to rid the world of preventable and reversible blindness by supporting desperately needed health care services.

In addition to sight programs, Lions Clubs International is committed to providing services for youth. Lions clubs also work to improve the environment, build homes for the disabled, support diabetes education, conduct hearing programs and, through their foundation, provide disaster relief around the world.

Lions Clubs International has grown to include 1.4 million men and women in 46,000 clubs located in 192 countries and geographic areas.